A Day Filled with Surprise

It was a day filled with surprises. Picked out from the bucket wish list was ‘The Pasta Bowl Company’ which became the venue for our family outing – a mini reunion of sorts since son came down from Jaipur (hostel) and we two from the emerald islands (Andamans).

Going by standard yardstick of ‘”white wine during daytime” I rummaged through the wine list and almost homed on to a Chardonnay. But that was not to be (being out of stock).

Well, it was a Rose wine which was seeking us that day (yes, they say a good wine too seeks to be savoured and appreciated).

We ordered the Robert Mondavi “Woodbridge Zinfandel Rose” from Lodi wine region, California. It was my first tryst with a Zinfandel Rose and the first sip told me that it’s going to be memorable.

Again, the textbook parings of pasta and pizza with the Rose wine worked well for us. The restaurant rightfully prides in serving Italian fare with fresh and light ingredients and these paired wonderfully with the wine.

But the surprise was in the dessert. Best is saved for last – as goes the saying.

Now, the thumb rule is that “wine should be sweeter than the dessert”. So I was not expecting the wine to pair in anyway with the “Blueberry Cheese cake” which we had ordered. No harm in trying though (the vino in me whispered) – and I agreed without much resistance.

And as they say – the world of wines us full of surprises. A sip of the Zinfandel Rose with the cake paired exceptionally well resulting in a pleasurable culinary sensation.

The family outing with Zinfandel Rose with succulent Italian fare and the BBC cake indeed became a memorable one and has since got etched in the wine memory.

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4 Basic Wine Elements

When I was doing my wine course, my instructor had said – “remember these four basic elements in a wine – if these are present then the wine will have the potential to age”.

His words since got imprinted on my wine memory. Today, I feel happy to share these with everyone in form of a short presentation.

Hope you appreciate it and benefit from these. Questions / views are welcome.

Check out the clip on YouTube too and do subscribe to the channel.

https://youtu.be/KN9DV93TWIA

Coravin Screw Caps

Coravin is the magical contraption that allows you to draw wine from a bottle without opening the cork. This way you can pour limited portion of wine without worrying that the balance will go bad. Certainly an oeonological boon, is it not ?

However, can Coravin be used for screw cap wine bottles as well ?

To the delight of wine lovers, it does (However, this innovation is only available in Australia and new Zealand for the moment)

How Coravin Works for Screwcaps

1 Grab your favourite bottle of expensive wine that’s sealed with a screwcap
2 Remove and discard existing screwcap
3 Immediately replace with Coravin Screw Cap
4 Push the hollow needle of the Coravin System through Coravin Screw Cap
5 Continue to use Coravin as if it was bottled with a cork.

After pouring, remove the needle, and the Coravin Screw Cap will re-seal to protect the wine from oxidation.

Source : The Wine Wankers, read the full article at http://bit.ly/2xGoG5F

Video Clip :

https://youtu.be/ufePcdaEX0g

Cava de paraje –  the Grand Cru of Cava       

Cava, the Sparkling wine wine from Spain has, over recent years, gained much favour amongst wine consumers world over and this along with Prosecco (Italian bubbly) is increasingly proving a viable competition to the French Champagne.

Now, “Cava de Paraje“, the new proverbial ‘grand cru’ of Cava, could become a reality soon –  according to the Spanish agriculture ministry
As per Cava Regulatory Board, the rules for same would include a maximum yield of 8000 kg/ha, 36 months of ageing in the bottle, only vintage wines and only brut styles.
Certainly a reason to celebrate for the Cava fans.

( Read more at  https://goo.gl/qKcCsM

Source – Vinexpo )

The first 12 cava sites, and their owners, are:

Harvest 2016

 Lamps fired to prevent vineyard frost 

“Vintage” in wine terminology refers to the year in which the grapes are picked (harvested).

World over, the 2016 vintage is likely to produce lesser volume of wines as compared to previous years owing to inclement weather conditions – almost a 20 year low production as per estimates.

El Nino in South America, frost and hail in France and poor weather conditions in South Africa – all these are likely to result in reduced yields.

As per OIV – Intn’l Organization of Vine and Wine, in 2016 approx 259.5 million hectolitres of wine will be produced around the world which is about 5% less than last year.

The picture shows fires being lit in vineyards as anti frost measures.

References-
http://www.oiv.int and http://www.decanter.com

Pic- Google Images

Yes that would be wonderful..

Why don’t you try some french wine with food” ? – an innocuous question by the bearer at a french bistro in New Delhi. I had taken my wife for an anniversary dinner. Till then I had never liked wines and wanted to say – “No, thank you”. Maybe the french ambience got better of me and I found myself uttering – Yes, that would be wonderful.

So the wines were served with dinner and it would be much later that I would register what we had – Chardonnay (White wine) for her and Cabernet Sauvignon (Red wine) for me – labels which were alien to me then.

The wines cast their magic- the aromatic, crisp, fresh white wine and the soft, rounded, fruity red wine bowled us over. The wine – food combination was so pleasurable that it sparked in me a keen interest in wines – which developed into a passion soon.

Thus, a simple visit to a bistro actually started my wine trail. So, to all those who often wonder about wines but are unsure whether you will like it or not – hit a bistro in your neighbourhood and when asked about wines just say – “Yes, that would be wonderful”. I promise you it would be so.